Dashlane launched in beta back in 2012, and has risen to prominence since largely because of its attention to its interface (which is sharp and easy to use), simple security, easy auto-login, form auto-fill, and logging of purchases and orders from online shops. It’s picked up a number of updates since then, including support for two-factor authentication, the ability to share passwords with emergency contacts in case you can’t access your accounts, and most recently, the ability to change multiple passwords on dozens of websites with a few clicks. Dashlane will also notify you if you have an account on a site that’s hacked, and with its built-in password changer, you can have Dashlane reset the password to a new, unique, strong one without leaving the interface. If you want to change all your passwords at once, you can do that too. The purchase tracking and digital wallet features make it easy to make online purchases even at retailers you don’t have accounts with, and search all of your online orders in one place, while secure note and document sharing gives you a place to store passwords that can’t be automatically filled in. Dashlane also gives you the option to store your passwords locally only in an encrypted vault (where only you have the master key), or to sync them to your devices and access them on the web. Dashlane supports Windows, OS X, Android, and iOS, and has plugins for Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Internet Explorer. It’s free to download and use, but if you want your passwords synced across devices, you’ll need Dashlane Premium, at $40/yr.

Dashlane’s nomination thread was also pretty popular, with many of you praising the tool for making password management simple and easy to do—almost an inviting task that you’ll actually want to do, which is an accomplishment on its own. Making people actually want to take control of their security because the interface is easy enough to use is a big deal, and Dashlane’s UI shows you right up front what your overall security “score” is, and gives you easy tips to improve it right then and there. Those of you who use it praised it for its seamless syncing, digital wallet, auto-fill across all of your devices, and its new multi-site password changer. It’s not perfect though—a number of you noted that it’s great…as long as you were grandfathered into its free plan (when syncing was still free), and noted that $40/yr was steep considering the competition is generally less and on-par feature-wise.